When a pop-artist references something from "Back in the day," they're usually talking about the '80s or '90s... But not usually the 1890s. Not so for Olly Moss, who's debut book for publisher Titan is a collection of olde timey silhouettes, but with a twist: they're profiles of modern actors, musicians, and characters from movies and TV.

By doing that, he manages to somehow recontextualize the images, and make them into witty comments about how we identify, and identify with figures from pop culture. You know: art or whatever. It's pretty neat though, and often deeply funny. The book will hit stores on October 30th, but we've got a sneak peak at some of the silhouettes inside... Can you identify them all? Read More...

MTV Geek LOVES Halloween -- so we've decided to share our fave frightful movies, TV shows, comics, and books with you all month long!

How to effectively sum up David Wong's (not his real name) 2007 novel about a pair of slackers' epic battles against the forces of darkness. Or, you know, whatever.

Encapsulating John Dies At the End in those broad Reaper/Clerks-meets-the apocalypse terms might provide a broad outline of what writer Jason Pargin is able to achieve here. This book might not make you keep the lights on at night, but in considering a possible confrontation with ultimate evil with a shrug, it's both funny and sad, and memorable.

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If you're not familiar with Scott Campbell's "Great Showdowns," you're missing out on one of the Internet's most delightful memes. Actually, that's not totally accurate, as Campbell paints all the Showdowns himself, so it's not technically a meme. But that's probably the closest we can come to explaining what GS is like.

But here's what it actually is, and the concept is simple: Campbell paints the greatest face-offs in movie history. What makes it unique is how pleased everyone is to be there, as well as some of the non-traditional scenes the artist pulls from; like John McClane versus broken glass, or Titanic versus the iceberg. With Titan Books releasing a beautiful, nearly pocket-sized collection of Great Showdowns on October 30th, we snagged some of Campell's faves from the book, and got his commentary on what makes these particular showdowns so great:

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Over two decades after he passed away, Jim Henson continues to capture the imagination of the world through his creations, from The Muppets, to the Fraggles, and beyond. Now, you can view his imagination in a whole new way with Chronicle Books "Imagination Illustrated: The Jim Henson Journal."

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By Elizabeth Keenan

Over the years, Dracula has changed from a first sinister, Gothic incarnation to the cloak-wearing, I-vant-to-suck-your-blood character of 1950s B-movies, and finally to his re-birth as a tortured soul in 1992’s Francis Ford Coppola’s "Bram Stoker’s Dracula".

The panelists at New York Comic Con's "The Mysteries Surrounding The Writing Of Dracula, And How The Character Has Changed In The Past 115 Years" —Bram’s great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker, SUNY Buffalo professor John Browning, and screenwriter James V. Hart—explored these changes to a packed room. Read More...

Winter is coming...to your coffee tables thanks to the newly-released behind the scenes tome "Inside Game of Thrones." A few weeks ago We spoke with the book's author, Bryan Cogman about the book, but now, you can get a copy all to yourself!

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The next book from 'A Song of Ice and Fire' (a.k.a., "Game of Thrones" to you TV fans) author George R. R. Martin is an expansive book of maps called 'The Lands of Ice and Fire.' The maps are fully illustrated by Jonathan Roberts, including the centerpiece: a fold-out "Map of the Known World," featuring the whole of Westeros as it's never been seen before.

That's not all though... There's close up maps of the cities, the wilderness, and something we're incredibly excited about: maps showing the exact path all the characters in the books take as they travel on their journeys. For anyone who has read Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series, I don't have to tell you how valuable this map will be to future re-readings of the books. Read More...

MTV Geek LOVES Halloween -- so we've decided to share our fave frightful movies, TV shows, comics, and books with you all month long!

Throughout the late 80's and into the 90's, British author Brian Lumley wrote a series of horror/sci-fi novels about Harry Keough, famed writer and sometime employee of a special branch of the British government who could, among other things, speak to the dead, teleport, and would later become a lusty vampire over the course of five novels. Deliriously violent, overwritten, and a little bizarre in its handling of sex, Lumley nonetheless wrote a series of compulsively readable novels about a man who lived (and died, and lived again) for the dead.

Lumley's novels--hammered out at something like one a year in both the main series and in new collections and expanded stories, tells the story of Harry Keogh, called "the Necroscope" by both the living and the dead for his ability to communicate with the other side. The stories were a curious mix of Soviet espionage, serial killer thriller, hard sci-fi involving the intersection of magic and math, and gradually, transdimensional vampire stories.

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"Let the Right One In" writer, John Ajvide Lindqvist has created a true horror story with "Little Star." It's not a slasher, it's not about monsters, it's not about ghosts. It's a book about the horrors of existence. The horrors of loneliness. The horrors of fame. The horrors of youth. The horrors of violence. The horrors of life.

"Little Star" is almost unbearably stark, relentless in its decent into darkness, and fearless in its graphic violence. But most importantly, it's brilliant.

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It's no secret that higher education is becoming more and more expensive here in the U.S. Thankfully, some people realize how big the issue has become and California has stepped up to help students out in a big way. On Thursday, September 27th Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a proposal that offers students free, digital textbooks.

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Famous weird food eater Andrew Zimmern has gone to some strange places, and eaten stranger food. Now, with his third book "Andrew Zimmern’s Field Guide to Exceptionally Weird, Wild, and Wonderful Foods: An Intrepid Eater’s Digest," he’ll be taking you there, too! The delightful volume is an alphabetical guide to the most offal foods in the world… As well as tips for fighting off vampires and zombies (seriously).

We chatted with Zimmern by phone - as he was on set in a remote location filming "Bizarre Foods" – to find out more. “I wanted to provide a really funny, ribald cave that boys and girls could go to, from a reading experience point of view,” Zimmern told us. “I wanted create a book that your bad uncle would buy for you!”

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George R.R. Martin Talks Comic Influences

George R.R. Martin is almost as famous for his propensity for killing beloved characters as he is for creating the whole of "Game of Thrones." But where does the influence of killing come from? It turns out, "Avengers #9," the first and--at the time, anyway--last appearance of hero-cum-villain-cum-hero Wonder Man. When we spoke with Martin at World-Con 2012 he said:

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In an interview with BBC News, superstar author J.K. Rowling said her adults-only "Harry Potter" follow-up "The Casual Vacancy" could be followed by a new children's story.

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It's the gorram tenth anniversary of "Firefly," so it looks like Browncoats are going to be doing it up with one of biggest parties in the 'verse. Kicking that off, a reprint of Titan Books' best-selling "Firefly - A Celebration" in a fancy new casing worthy of the Tams themselves. Well, Simon, maybe.

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By Steven Smith

My brother spent most of his early life in hospitals, which meant I spent most of mine in hospital waiting rooms. This was before iPhones, or cell phones even. There were handheld games but they royally sucked. I also didn’t have one. But I did have books and one of those books was "The Hobbit".

"The Hobbit" was a special book to me because my father gave me his copy from when he was a child. I had already seen the Rankin/Bass cartoon version of the story, and unfortunately the Ralph Bakshi "Lord of the Rings" (where the Nazgul scared the living shit out of me – thanks Dad, way to research) but hadn’t read the book yet.

I was mesmerized with "The Hobbit". Pretty certain I read it in one sitting. I saw Rivendell through Bilbo’s eyes, was scared to death when the Trolls took them, thrilled at the Battle of the Five Armies, and won’t even get into how creeped out I was from Gollum. I was THAT kid, who would stay up all night to finish a book once they got into it. "The Hobbit" was, is, and forever shall be that kind of story for readers ad infinitum. Read More...

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