I'm no Matt Morgan, and I want to get that out of the way up front. Our resident Hobby Gaming expert knows the ins-and-outs of every game out there, while I don't really know my Magics from my Gatherings. See, I don't even know that's one game, that's how out of it I am. So when a card game manages to seep through into my consciousness, you know that it's moved far past "early adopter" stage. "Cards Against Humanity" is one of those games, and it's poised to break into the mainstream, big time. Read More...

The "Star Wars" fan community might be busy talking about some new television show, announced at Star Wars Celebration VI this weekend, but the big surprise for gamers was Fantasy Flight's announcement of a brand new "Star Wars" roleplaying game.
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"Daleks, Cybermen, Sontarans – The list of threats is endless and no place in the universe is ever truly safe from danger, but there is one man who has made it his mission to defend the defenseless, help the helpless, and save everyone he can: a mysterious stranger, a force of nature who has seen his own planet die, a madman with a box."

Given the popularity of Doctor Who, it comes as a surprise that the franchise hasn't yet had a standout board or card game adaptation. It's not for lack of trying though, as there are plenty of lackluster Who-themed games. At this year's Gen Con, publisher Cubicle 7 came armed with a serious one-two punch: the Doctor Who license and revered (and appropriately British) hobby game designer Martin Wallace.

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During the "Bones" Kickstarter project video, a Reaper Miniatures employee begins to lay out all of the miniatures included in the set.

Something special is happening over at Kickstarter right now, as Reaper Miniatures has broken all previous hobby gaming crowdfunding records with time to spare. As of Friday morning, their Bones project still has 36 hours to go with a funding total of $2.1M, putting it in the #4 spot for all-time funded gaming projects behind such high-profile projects as the Ouya, Double Fine Adventure, and Wasteland 2.

So why are people yelling "take my money!" at Reaper Miniatures? Apparently, there is a very large pent up demand for inexpensive little plastic fantasy models. Games using miniatures have a bad reputation for being expensive, as in "break the bank" expensive, but a big part of the recipe for Kicktarter success is that Reaper Miniatures has continued to expand the scope of their project as new "stretch goals" are hit. What originally started out as a range of 67 plastic miniatures for $100, and was already a good deal at that price, has nearly tripled in size to include over 190 individual figures.

The image showing what you get at the $100 level is so large that I cannot even embed it here. You'll just have to check out the project page for yourself.

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Box art from two of Days of Wonder's earliest titles.

You may know Days of Wonder as the publisher of the million-copy-selling Ticket to Ride, which is hard to avoid these days given its status as one of the most popular modern board games and its successful video game ports, but that's not where the company got its start. In a return to its roots, Days of Wonder has decided to publish new editions of some of its oldest titles: Mystery of the Abbey and Pirate's Cove.

Now I understand, odds are you haven't heard of either of these games. But that doesn't mean you should turn away. If you take a look at the 10-year-old publisher's track record, you'll see that they have shown surprising restraint in which games to publish. To put it bluntly, Days of Wonder chooses quality over quantity. It's a company strategy that VP Mark Kaufmann shared with me during a chat at PAX Prime 2011, and it shows, making Days of Wonder games worth a second look. If you're looking to bring something a little bit different to your next game night, read on to see that made Mystery of the Abbey and Pirate's Cove worth bringing back onto store shelves.

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What do Mars Attacks, Pathfinder, and The Guild all have in common? Not much, but they'll all be turned into licensed games at the hands of Steve Jackson and company.
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Iconic D&D art displayed on-screen during Gen Con's keynote address

So far, 2012 has been a year packed with Dungeons & Dragons news, and Gen Con 2012 was no different. Wizards of the Coast led off the year with the announcement of D&D Next, a new version of the popular roleplaying game that would replace D&D 4th Edition, and for that matter, all editions that came before it.
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Couldn't make it out to Indianapolis for the "Best Four Days in Gaming?" No sweat! While Gen Con may be kicking off as you read this, publisher Fantasy Flight Games has made sure you can enjoy the fun from afar. Their two games, "Star Wars: X-Wing Miniatures Game" and "Android: Netrunner," are among the most anticipated releases of the con, and you can download .pdf of versions of the full rule book for each.

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It's beginning to feel a lot like the late '90s in here. If you're not already familiar with the deck-building card game concept, you will be soon, as it is growing with a pace not seen since collectible card games took over hobby stores some 15 years ago. Now the heroes and villains of Marvel comics will be starring in their own deck-building card game come November, when Upper Deck publishes Marvel: Legendary.
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Think of all the burning questions you have about the hobby gaming industry. Don't worry, they'll come to you, just keep thinking. Now what if there was a place where you could watch a live debate, featuring a panel of gaming industry professionals attempting to answer these questions? Lucky for you, that show premieres tonight at 9PM EST, when Boardroomers kicks off its first episode using Google+ Hangouts On Air.

Think of Boardroomers as a version of ESPN's Around the Horn for board game nerds. If you are both interested in board games and actually got that sports reference, then you are just the sort of keen audience member that Boardroomers wants watching live, submitting topics, and even contributing to the in-show Twitter Q&A.

So who exactly are the Boardroomers, and why should you care what they have to say?

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Dungeons & Dragons basic rules pamphlets, circa 1981. Image by Jennie Ivins

Over the course of the past four weeks, we've been chatting with the men behind Dungeons & Dragons: Mike Mearls, Rodney Thompson, Bruce Cordell, James Wyatt, and Chris Perkins, to discuss their history with the  franchise. If you missed the first few installments, go read about the group's favorite settings, favorite play experiences, favorite all-around products, and proudest accomplishments while working at Wizards of the Coast. Today, we'll conclude this series with a look towards the future, asking each of our interviewees about their expectations for the future of Dungeons & Dragons: D&D Next. 

But they're not going to get off easy. D&D Next is being billed as a massive unifying effort, bringing together all roleplayers no matter which D&D edition they hold dear, and convincing them to drop the edition-speak entirely. Since a modular ruleset should allow players to combine their favorite aspects of past editions, we asked our panel exactly that: which two features of D&D's past they look forward to merging in future games of D&D Next. 

Mike Mearls: This is an easy one for me. I can’t wait to use basic D&D’s speed and ease of character creation with 4e’s adventure design guidelines.

Back when I lived in Boston, I used to run a lot of pickup D&D games. It got to the point where I spent a day creating a set of eight player characters for my friends to pick from. If we wanted to just play D&D, it took an hour to make 1 st-level characters, or much longer to make a 3rd or 4th level one. By the same token, as a DM I had to either write up stuff ahead of time or draw from a set of adventures I had read beforehand.

I like that the 4e rules make creating a short adventure fast and easy. In Next I want to make it even easier by introducing the option to use
random tables for monsters and treasure that are built on a system like 4e’s.

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Board game publisher WizKids is turning their Quarriors! dice game into a full-fledged franchise, and they've got plenty more "Q" puns to back it up. Quarriors!: Quest of the Qladiator, the fourth game in the series, has been announced for a November 2012 release.

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I look down to check the time: there's a good five minutes left until I'm expecting to meet up with actor Rich Sommer, but a flash of hand-waving grabs my attention from the corner of my eye. Sommer is instantly recognizable from his role as Harry Crane on Mad Men. I am vaguely recognizeable from my Twitter avatar and the appearance of a man waiting for someone. We're both a bit early, but who can blame us? We're here to talk about games, and games are supposed to be fun.
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The geeks are coming! The geeks are coming!

Move over Monopoly. Make way Candyland. Some new games are hitting the shelves at Target, and they're decidedly geeky. Target began a slow roll-out of hobby gaming titles at its stores last year, but according to an announcement on the Geek & Sundry website, the retailer is preparing to go full blast in cooperation with the TableTop web series.
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The Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set, as advertised in Marvel Comic's The West Coast Avengers issue #15 Dec 1986. Photo by RPGGeek.com user Nazhuret, used under Creative Commons License.

Over the course of five weeks, we'll be chatting with Mike Mearls, Rodney Thompson, Bruce Cordell, James Wyatt, and Chris Perkins about their history with the Dungeons and Dragons franchise. If you missed the first three installments, go read about the group's favorite settings, favorite play experiences, and proudest accomplishments while working at Wizards of the Coast. Today, we'll force our interviewees to make some tough choices by asking them which product, out of everything Dungeons & Dragons-related ever released, they view as their favorite.
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