If you see one movie with Abraham Lincoln this year, see Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln." If you're hankering to see two, revisit "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure."

"Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" has always had the rep of a poor man's, stoned-out "Back to the Future," and to a certain extent, it's true. Director Stephen Herek's 1989 feature, from a script by writing duo Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon makes its greatest complication the delayed thought processes of its two stoners without being stoned heroes, but that's kind of part of the fun. The plot, if you'll recall, sees would-be rockstars Bill S. Preston, Esq. (Alex Winter) and Ted "Theodore" Logan (Keanu Reeves) on the verge of failing their history class and given a time machine the future wise man Rufus (George Carlin) in order to complete their final report so that they might fulfill their destiny of uniting the universe with their music.

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Hey, Tarantino fans, Lionsgate just collected his entire filmography in a 10-disc Blu-ray boxset, which includes all eight of his solo efforts and two discs of special features.

So has the studio done right by 20 years of film history with this collection? Well, it can't be called comprehensive (his contributions to "Four Rooms" and "From Dusk Til Dawn" qualify both of those movies places here), but what's here, largely discs from Lionsgate's own catalog, is thorough.

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The efficient, vicious siege movie "The Day" hides a couple of cards up its sleeve for the first third of its running time--namely, the mysterious threat that has a band of five travelers on the road, on the run, hungry, tired, and sick after what is apparently some kind of widespread catastrophe. And while the final reveal may come with some small amount of disappointment, the greater part of "The Day" is one of those unexpected little horror gems--full of surprising character work, an intriguing end of the world scenario, and a final, tense and bloody siege.

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In a week where we're having the same conversation about what women and girls can or can't do in fandom (let's call it "The War On Women Who Like To Dress Like Supergirl"), I want to say that the release of Disney/Pixar's "Brave" is particularly relevant. Co-directors/co-writers Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman's girl-empowering tale has been seized upon as Pixar's attempt to disrupt the Disney princess formula, offering the beloved animation studio's own heroic-minded take on that increasingly dusty trope.

And if Pixar was looking to break ranks from the tried and true princess is saved by/marries prince narrative arc, then they're largely successful with "Brave." But it's a shame that Pixar's first film with a female lead packs less of the punch, or let's say "heart" or they're previous work. Built on a simpler, more time-tested formula, "Brave" doesn't surprise the way "The Incredibles" did before it or nearly bring you to emotional collapse the way the second and third "Toy Story" movies were able to. It's a fine movie, just not Pixar-good.

****Spoilers after the jump****

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Between 1978 and 1994 (the period between "Halloween" and "In the Mouth of Madness"), John Carpenter had a nearly unbroken string of at times brilliant but always intriguing horror and sci-fi films. Among those was 1988's "They Live," an oddity that really shouldn't play as well as it does with a wrestler-turned actor leading a story about the homeless of L.A. discovering a trans-dimensional plot to create a docile underclass while lining the pockets of the upper class?

And okay, the movie is a little rough around the edges: star "Rowdy" Roddy Piper wasn't a natural performer but he was an earnest one, giving homeless hero-turned-freedom fighter Nada heart as one half of a buddy action movie with co-star Keith David ("The Thing"). We should really celebrate movies like this from Carpenter, and Shout! Factory seems to have agreed, giving "They Live" the deluxe treatment on Blu-ray.

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The Monkeybrains Studio release through Comixology, "Spirit of the Law," is the latest from "Witch Doctor" creator Brandon Seifert, featuring art by Michael Montenat. "Spirit of the Law" sees Sefiert going supernatural high concept again, but instead of a doctor tasked with curing the mystic ills of the world, it's about gangsters rubbing out the wrong woman, and the vengeful spirit that pursues them.

The story, whose first issue debuted just in time for Halloween, has its writer testing his writing skills against noir--mingling his story of supernatural justice with gangsters, molls, and bosses. So does Seifert and artist succeed in bringing the two worlds together?

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If you're a horror fan, sometimes you simply have to go back to your roots--take the opportunity every once in a while to revisit (or explore for the first time) some of the classics that laid the foundation for Freddy, Jigsaw, or Jet Li featuring prominently in a Mummy movie. With Universal's eight movie Essential collection (technically, nine with the Spanish-language version of Dracula), you can do that as the studio celebrates the monsters in its closets in a gorgeous collection.

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Season four of the Adult Swim animated metal series is a departure from previous seasons mostly because it's clear that creator Brendon Small is reaching some kind of end game for the actual "Metalocalypse" that gives the show its title. The added continuity and feeling that one of the characters might--gasp--grow in the course of this season add to the sense of disorientation, even as the slightly shortened season remains as funny as ever.

Plus, with the release of The Dethalbum III, it looks like Small and the real-life members of the fake band behind Dethklok are moving beyond some of the same jokes and even style of the first two albums.

Change is afoot and the end is near. Doodly doo.

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Laurianne Uy's Polterguys is not quite manga—it's an American graphic novel done in a manga style, a reverse harem story with some nice Japanese-style flourishes but a definitely American sensibility.

The setup is pure manga: A pleasant but nerdy girl gets an apartment in a house that turns out to be haunted—by the ghosts of five cute guys. Four are teenage hotties, while the youngest one, Simon, adds a cuddly note to the group and gives everyone someone to be protective of. The guys don't remember how they died, and they aren't sure why they all ended up in the same house, but they don't get out much, so they are happy to see their new neighbor. So happy that they clean the house, fix her pancakes, and accompany her to classes. This part reminded me a bit of dating-sim manga like "Ugly Duckling's Love Revolution," where the guys exist mainly to please the girl. (Well, we can dream, can't we?) A sinister note enters the story, however, when a bounty hunter shows up to claim his prey, and Bree risks her own life to keep the guys on this side of the Rubicon. Read More...

I genuinely wish I could know what was going on in the heads of "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" fans in '86 when they stepped out of the (few) theaters showing the sequel--or even its backers at B-movie studio Cannon, who footed the bill for "Chainsaw 2." What did they think about how their money was spent? Tobe Hooper's stark update of the Sawney Bean legend by way of Ed Gein had built up an almost legendary reputation for its violence and brutality in spite of a lack of onscreen bloodshed.

And 12 years later, he returned with a followup that's not only a tonal 180 from the original, replacing its almost matter-of-fact, nearly documentary style terror with buckets of gore violence in service of a splattery black comedy. The initial response wasn't kind to the movie so violent, it skipped on a rating, and so odd, the subsequent sequels pretty much pretended it didn't exist.

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This pseudo slasher from "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" director Tobe Hooper was a real blind spot in my knowledge of his previous work. And that's a shame, because while I grew up on his "Poltergeist" and have a lot of affection for his unloved vampires from space epic "Life Force," I never really thought of him as being a visual stylist.

In fact, thinking back on his horror work, the first thing that immediately comes to mind is the low-fi, grimy look of "TCM," which makes this 1981 film all the more interesting. Also: it has a deformed killer, nods to black-gloved killers, and carnie law, and if those aren't reasons to pick up Shout! Factory's recent Blu-ray release, then I don't know what else I can say to convince you to see this movie.

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There are many different ways to enjoy "Dungeons and Dragons," the hobby gaming property most known for its core roleplaying game. For instance, take the newly-released "Dungeon Command" miniatures game. As a skirmish-scale combat game, "Dungeon Command" aims to break down some of the barriers of miniatures gaming by using pre-painted figures in small 12-on-12 battles.

Complete armies (known as warbands in "Dungeon Command") are sold in ready-to-play faction packs, with options to further expand and customize a warband in advanced play. Today, we'll be reviewing those first two faction packs: "Heart of Cormyr" and "Sting of Lolth."

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Did you ever see "Jason Takes Manhattan"? Yeah, "Starship Troopers: Invasion" is the "Jason Takes Manhattan" of "Starship Troopers" movies. Just what does this CG animated feature from "Appleseed" and "Appleseed Ex Machina" director Shinji Aramaki and video game writer Flint Dille have to do with eighth movie in the long-running slasher series?

Well, besides the fact that neither of them has Casper Van Dien, both woefully over-promise on their concepts, and under-deliver in the execution, completely failing to deliver the promised carnage of the title.

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My life feels like a snake leaving its old skin behind. I'm an adult now, in my new adult skin. It's exciting. Our future is a blank slate. Anything is possible.

- Sexica

The above quote perfectly encapsulates not only what I believe to be the theme of "Prophet" writer Brandon Graham's ambitious new Image Comics mini-series "Multiple Warheads: Alphabet to Infinity," but it sums up my feelings as I get lost in his fully-realized yet purposefully incomplete world - anything is possible in this comic. This is creativity unleashed. This is an artist unhinged. This is freedom. This is authenticity. And this is where comics should live.

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Throwing a typically unhinged Gary Busey into a mixer with killer fish, a T&A-heavy water park, and slumming David Hasselhoff playing a slumming David Hasselhoff might not be everyone's idea of a likely good time, but I thought that with "Feast" director John Gulager at the helm, some kind of wit and gruesome fun might be had in "Piranha 3DD." Unfortunately, Gulager's 3D followup to director David Aja's resurrection of the "Piranha" franchise is pretty toothless, tasteless, and not all that fun.

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