Celebrity and former "Star Trek" actor George Takei recently announced on his Facebook page that he will be guest-starring -- sort of -- in a new "Dick Tracy" storyline. Here's the word from George:

"Beginning last Sunday (Jan. 13), and continuing for about two months, the Dick Tracy comic strip on Sundays is featuring a storyline involving me and my husband Brad. I appear under the name "George Tawara." The story has a WWII internment connection, and we are truly honored to be a part of it." Read More...

It's not clear if Touchstone Pictures or parent company Disney knew what they had in their hands back in 1990 with "Dick Tracy." It was a passion project for star Warren Beatty who took over directing duties for the project and brought on some of his famous friends like Al Pacino, Dustin Hoffman, and then-girlfriend Madonna (did they start dating during or after--I can't recall), and the whole thing was the first of several not-great attempts to bring classic comic strips to the big screen (see "Brenda Starr," "The Phantom"). In this case, it was the first splashy, big-budget comic-to-film adaptation to land after Tim Burton's "Batman," and with its ripped-from-the-comic strip look, high body count, and brief nudity, "Dick Tracy" did the "Sin City" on film thing before "Sin City" did.

But in spite of a stellar cast led by Beatty as the square-jawed cop, "Dick Tracy" never comes to life--it's the rough idea of a "Dick Tracy" movie, stiff, formless, and kind of dumb.

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Comic book fans probably know writer Max Allan Collins best from his Road To Perdition series of crime graphic novels. But Collins is also a crime historian in his own right, having collaborated extensively with Mickey Spillane, and others. With a new collaboration between Collins and the departed author hitting on May 8th - titled Lady, Go Die - we checked in with Collins to find out what his Top 10 Crime Comics of all time are. So without further ado, we'll turn it over to him:

"Before I get into this list, I should cop to excluding anything or anybody modern. I am notorious for not encouraging the competition."

1. DICK TRACY. In 1931, after a decade of unsuccessful submissions to the Chicago Tribune Syndicate, Chester Gould finally gave up on humor and tried something different – a detective strip based on real-life G-men like Eliot Ness and equally real-life bad guys like Al Capone. Gould’s geometric expressionism looked like bad art to some, but the public loved it, particularly when his villains grew grotesque (Flattop, Pruneface, the Mole) in an effort to compete with wartime front pages. IDW is reprinting Gould in fat two-year collections, and perhaps his greatest story – “The Case of the Fiendish Photographers” – will be featured in the next volume.

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Netflix has done a great job adding new content to instant streaming over the past year, especially when it comes to animated series. We know Marvel and DC have made a ton of their TV series available recently, but we’re not talking about those here. Nor are we talking about Dora the Explorer and SpongeBob. We’re more interested in the cartoons we grew up with -- and the classics we can’t help but love.

After browsing through all Netflix had to offer we found a bunch of animated series' we feel should not only be revisited, but celebrated. Head past the break to see what we dug up! Read More...

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